1) Paul Simon: Train in the Distance

Paul_Simon_at_the_9-30_Club_(d)

Favorite Line or Lyric:

“The thought that life could be better, is woven indelibly into our hearts and our brains”

Overview

Train in the distance is a song about longing. The thought that just over the horizon is the reward. Chasing the greener grass. The song begins with an older man falling for a younger, and married woman. They eventually fall in love and have a child. But, all is not happily ever after. The promises that come from the Train in the Distance devolve into the reality of life. They both start hearing new trains in the distance. The thought that life could be better, so they drift apart.

While the song is performed in Simon’s understated upbeat way, the underlying sadness of the chase destroying the foundation is strong in the song. The last line (which I chose for my favorite lyric) is what grabs me. I don’t believe in the grass is greener. I have been on both sides of the fence.

I believe in hard work in life and in relationships. But, I also believe that can always be better. It is what we make of it. We don’t need to destroy families to get there. But sometimes, two people simply should not be together. My parents dicvoverce was one of the happiest times in my life, for several reasons, but the most important, was the hope that both my parents might love on to find the happiness that they could not find in each other.

Artist:  Paul Simon

Song: Train in the Distance

Genre: Singer/Songwriter

Music Stuff: Slow and mellow. Typical Paul Simon, it sounds so simple, but its peppered with great chords, Maj. 9th’s, 6-th’s and 11-th’s are scattered throughout, giving it the distinctive Simon Sound.

Release Year: 1983

Album(s): Hearts & Bones

Full Lyrics: https://play.google.com/music/preview/Tdtxjchft5ciknwrdmww35gedx4?lyrics=1&utm_source=google&utm_medium=search&utm_campaign=lyrics&pcampaignid=kp-lyrics

Image Attribution: By Matthew Straubmuller (imatty35) (http://flickr.com/photos/imatty35/5767388060/) [CC BY 2.0], via Wikimedia Commons

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